Ragan’s PR Daily posted The 36 Rules of Social Media, an infographic created by Fast Company.

Do you follow these? Are there any you disagree with?

I like to keep #12 and #33 in mind: #12 because accepting failure comes with the territory when you’re working with an ever-changing and context-based medium – try predicting everything when building a new brand’s social media strategy. It’s pretty difficult/impossible#33 I enjoy as a mantra for marketing and business in general. It’s important to remember that your brand (if it’s a successful one) represents not only your product or service, but the people who use it. Your fans should interact with, and ultimately have a hand in generating content for your brand. Think of it as a 21st century take on “the customer is always right.”

Week 3: The Klout Experiment (Why One Bad Week Won’t Sink You)

This week, I learned that a downturn in engagement isn’t always a bad thing.

Every week, I document my Klout Experiment: a vain and foolish attempt to match Sarah Palin’s Klout score of 72 by January 1, 2013.

Generally, you’ll find me nerding out about all things Social Media, but I’m also looking for full-time work in Social Media. So, reading recent articles on the importance of Klout and other social scoring tools in recruiting got me thinking about the ways in which we determine our online influence.

Each week, I record the results of my Klout Experiment in a weekly social media engagement digest.

As we learned last week, my efforts to increase frequency across platforms proved ineffective, reducing my score to 60 from a glorious, glorious 61.

This week, I’ve actually managed to damage my score further, as I’m left this week with a measly score of 59!!!

After discovering my score decrease and short-circuiting my Macbook with bitter, bitter tears, I took a moment to re-consider the weight online brands put on their social influence scores..

What I realized is that a Klout score only reflects a small snapshot of my network’s engagement. So what if I miss the mark one week? Presumably, the measly 59 Klout points worth of engagement is from people who’ve enjoyed my overall online persona, before this week. Those followers will stay with me unless I start posting way too much on social media or I post something that really pisses them off.

The conclusion I came to about my decreasing Klout score applies to businesses, too: wavering metrics don’t mark failure, but a learning opportunity. And the fans who stick with you are the most evangelical, and thus the most likely to help you reach future benchmarks. 

How have you or your company leveraged a bad week? 

Week 2: The Klout Experiment (Why Twitter Might Not Be Worth It)

In my Klout Experiment, I attempt to match Sarah Palin’s Klout score of 72 by January 1, 2013 and record my findings.

Somehow, despite my best efforts to increase frequency and vary use of my social media outlets, I lost a point this week! I believe this may be related to how I divided my attention between Twitter, Facebook and Foursquare this week. I only posted on Facebook 4 times this week, as opposed to the 24 posts I had last week.

I decided to increase the frequency and interactiveness of my professional Twitter handle this week, replying to and RT’ing a few tweets from local comedians and Social Media Marketing bloggers. Although your Klout score accounts for only engagement (likes, comments, replies, RTs) and not frequency, I figured that tweeting more would help boost my score by potentially boosting engagement.

Getting traction on Twitter takes far more frequency (and great content, of course!) so  my hunch about increasing Twitter activity to increase my social influence score was partly correct: 1% of this week’s score originated from Twitter interactions, whereas last week’s score was 100% Facebook. But, that new Twitter contribution did not make up for a lack of engagement on Facebook and ultimately, my Klout score suffered.

Do you or our company think Twitter is worth the time and extra output?  

All-Star Klout-Off!

The Klout Experiment – Raising My Klout Score by The New Year

As a Social Media Strategist or as my mom puts it,  “professional Tweeter,” I pride myself on not only finding and engaging online influencers, but being one myself. It’s my humble opinion that in order to engage your brand’s most active users, you must walk a mile in those users’ shoes.

After reading Seth Stevenson’s remarkable piece on the growing ubiquity of the Klout Score – and its importance as a professional and personal tool – I attempted to take stock in my own online influence by taking a look at my somewhat inactive Klout account:

  • I could only register one of my Twitter accounts. I have 2, but the one associated with my main email address (and thus searchable by potential employers) is only 2-months old. So I went with my personal account, which has more followers.
  • I’m a Facebook addict – this is where the bulk of my new points derived
  • I’ve just started to use Foursquare. I absolutely love it and have earned quite a few “first check in” badges. I only have about 9 friends, though, which has more of an influence on my overall score.
  • Linkedin is a resource for me as a young professional, but sadly, I linked my Klout to the Linkedin page for my previous employer and have lost access to enable me to revoke permissions.

After this narcissistic digital dissection, I decided I needed to dig deeper. I needed to figure out exactly what it would take to become the kind of influencer my future employer(s) need to engage. As an individual with a Klout score of 61, I’m taking my cue from the job-seeking subject of Stevenson’s article, and conducting a weekly experiment:

I will try to raise my Klout score to 72 by January 1, 2013.

Why 72? Well, according to Wired.com’s infographic, Sarah Palin’s people have managed to get her that score.  Since I tend to tweet for brands and individuals far less cuckoo-bananas than Ms. Palin, it would actually pain me not to match or exceed her publicists’ Klout score.

All-Star Klout-Off!

At least I have a higher Klout score than the Aflac duck.

So, here’s to (completely amateur) scientific inquiry!

Do you track your Klout Score? Tell me in the comments!

A Perfect Storm for Facebook’s Demise?

Links to the video demo of The new Myspace have been flooding my timeline like Facebook’s Intro to Timeline did months ago, only in a completely positive way. The preview, which showcases a more intuitive and “Pinterest”-esque Myspace interface, are evoking excitement.

The New Myspace

As my newsfeed is also teeming with stories of Facebook’s looming legal troubles and (apparently false) rumours of privacy bugs, I’m starting to wonder if we don’t have a perfect storm for Facebook desertion on our hands.

If we do, what will be the next Facebook?

For businesses – particularly those marketing to women – it could be Pinterest. But Facebook always seems to weather a storm, and with great developer tools like Open Graph, it’s setting new precedents for corporate social networking and sharing, for which there may be no competition.