What Social Media Channel Should Your Company Use?

What Social Media Channel Should Your Company Use?

There are unique benefits to each social media platform. Here’s a quick breakdown of what each social media site can do for your business:

Twitter is for listening  If your brand is looking to start conversations with new leads or build long lasting relationships with closed ones, Twitter is the way to go.

Segment your Twitter followers and save industry-related keyword searches to listen in on what current and potential followers have to say. Of course, it helps if you have a product or service that people are already talking about!

What Social Media Channel Should Your Company Use?

Facebook is for showing off. Facebook’s dynamic page design options allow for contests, photo albums, videos, events, fan reviews, and location check-ins. Companies leverage Facebook page features, as well as its higher character limit for updates – to show off their company culture and brand identity.

LinkedIn is for thought leadership Whether your company is looking to hire or nurture leads, LinkedIn pages and groups put you in a position to publish original content on your industry.

Ambitious, high level professionals flock to LinkedIn for new resources from their favorite companies. With the right content, your brand can be one of the thought leaders that LinkedIn users follow and engage.

What Social Media Channel Should Your Company Use?

Pinterest is best for B2C… except when its not! If you can identify strong visuals for your content, and create more “infographic” material, then you can master Pinterest for B2B. If your company sells tangible products (especially pretty ones!) or services with tangible results (think, “food porn”), your brand can gain a Pinterest following.

Which social media channels does your business or employer leverage? Tell me in the comment section!

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3 Steps Buffer needs to take to compete with Hootsuite - Success Kid Gets It!

The 3 Features Buffer Needs to Compete with Hootsuite

During this week’s Hootsuite outage, I decided to finally use the Buffer account I had registered for months ago. I was pleasantly surprised to discover a short term alternative, but found that this San Francisco startup could make a few changes to its free app that would help Buffer compete against Hootsuite.

Here are the 3 features Buffer needs to compete with Hootsuite

1. Support for more profiles per user, on more social media platforms

Buffer needs to allow more than one account for each of the social networks it supports. The free version of Buffer allows you to schedule posts for up to 3 of your social media accounts, while Hootsuite’s free plan allows up to 5 social profiles, including Google + pages, foursquare, wordpress, Myspace, and Mix (not included on Buffer).

2. Give us streams!

One of the most useful real-time features Hootsuite offers is the ability for users to create customizable streams for each of their social network profiles. A user can choose to display just her home feed pane, or add panes to display most recent mentions, retweets, followers, DMs, lists,  favorites, scheduled posts, searches, wall posts, events, or popular discussions.

Adding a feed feature to its free version would make Buffer a better tool for monitoring and engagement. But what Buffer lacks in engagement potential, it makes up for in content curation capabilities… almost. Which brings me to my last suggestion:

3. Content curation customization (say that 3 times fast!)

Buffer and Hootsuite both offer great bookmarklets for Chrome. But from what I can tell, Buffer is the only social media monitoring tool that offers up its own content for sharing. “Suggested Tweets” are both homegrown and crowd-sourced. A user can choose suggested content ranging from quotes, to trending articles, to Buffer blog posts – which is great for community managers on a time crunch.

This is the most unique feature Buffer has to offer, so why limit it? Although the maximum of 5 content suggestions per day per profile is meant to incentivize free users to upgrade, it hinders user experience. Placing a limit on the number of suggested content posts without offering customization features means that users may end up stuck with irrelevant suggestions. What if Buffer’s algorithm doesn’t find the user what she’s looking for? A simple “This isn’t relevant” or “Don’t show me this kind of content” button would do the trick.

Lastly, after seeing a few repeats in my “Suggestions” queue, I’d recommend that Buffer include a few top fold calls to action, reminding users that they can submit their own content. This would likely make suggested content broader and deeper, while transforming Buffer into a viable syndication tool for content creators seeking more web traffic.

What are your experiences with social media dashboards? Do you prefer Hootsuite over Buffer?